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Sourdough Starter in Weck Jar

Sourdough Starter - The Pineapple Juice Method

Richard Bewley
5 from 3 votes
Prep Time 7 d
Cook Time 0 mins
Course Bread
Cuisine Central European

Equipment

  • Glass preserving jar with lid (I use Weck 580ml)
  • Digital measurement scales
  • Thermometer

Ingredients
  

  • Unsweetened pineapple juice
  • Filtered water
  • Dark Rye Flour
  • Unbleached strong white bread flour

Instructions
 

  • Day 1: In a small container, combine 2 tbsp (20g) rye flour with 2 tbsp pineapple juice (30g) and mix thoroughly (I use a metal chopstick). Stir 2-3 times per day to incorporate air into the mixture. Cover loosely with a paper towel to allow the mixture to breathe, but prevent any unwanted visitors. Leave for 24 hours at room temperature.
  • Day 2: Add 2 tbsp (20g) rye flour with 2 tbsp pineapple juice (30g) to the existing mixture, and mix thoroughly. Continue to aerate 2-3 times per day, and keep the paper cover. Leave for 24 hours at room temperature.
  • Day 3: Add 2 tbsp (20g) rye flour with 2 tbsp pineapple juice (30g) to the existing mixture, and mix thoroughly. Continue to aerate 2-3 times per day, and keep the paper cover. Leave for 24 hours at room temperature. You might start to see some activity now in the form of small bubbles.
  • Day 4: Mix thoroughly and discard all but 50 grams of the original stater. Transfer to a preserving jar (such as Weck). This time, add 50 grams of unbleached bread flour and 50g warm filtered water (35-40 degrees Celsius). Stir thoroughly with a fork, cover loosely, and leave for 24 hours at room temperature. You should start to see an increase in activity as the starter grows in size.
  • Day 5: Discard all but 50g of the starter, and add 50 grams of unbleached bread flour and 50g warm filtered water. Stir thoroughly with a fork, cover loosely, and leave for 24 hours at room temperature. The starter should become even more active.
  • Day 6: Discard all but 50g of the starter, and add 50 grams of unbleached bread flour and 50g warm filtered water. Stir thoroughly with a fork, cover loosely, and leave for 24 hours at room temperature. The starter should become even more active.
  • Day 7: By now, the starter should have doubled in size and be active. Congratulations, your Wild Yeast should be ready to go, and you can start to bake your first sourdough loaf. If you have not yet followed tradition and named your starter, it is not too late!
  • Now: As you have successfully created your very own Sourdough starter, it is time to bake your very own slow-ferment Sourdough bread loaf.

Notes

  1. Please note: the switch to unbleached bread flour on day 4. You may also see a thin skin develop on top of the rye flour/ pineapple juice mixture. This can be easily peeled off and discarded.
  2. If you are not seeing that your starter double in growth within 6-7 days, do not despair. Everyone's environmental conditions are different. Nearly every recommendation I have read refers to 'room temperature' but there are many variables.
  3. Some people have great success in their kitchen - mine is simply not warm enough throughout the day and I initially resorted to my boiler room. Depending on the time of year, this is usually around 20-22 degrees Celsius - a bit warmer would be preferable.
The following blog post proved very helpful to better understand Debra Wink's approach:
https://savorthebest.com/wild-yeast-sourdough-starter/
 
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!